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You searched for: Charles Dickens

The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit - Charles Dickens, F. Barnard (illustrator)

1872 - Harper & Brothers, New York - Household Edition
A handsomely bound edition of Dickens’ satirical comedy of hypocrisy, selfishness, and greed, the picaresque story of young Martin Chuzzlewit who, together with the scheming architect Pecksniff, journeys to America to seek his fortune. With 59 illustrations by Frederick Barnard and the text in double columns.

‘Any man may be in good spirits and good temper when he’s well dressed’.

As much of
Martin Chuzzlewit was inspired by Dickens travels in America in 1842, which left an unfavourable impression on him, he includes in this edition a Postscript quoting a speech given to 200 representatives of the Press of the United States of America, at a dinner given to him in New York in 1868. In this he lays out his admiration for the people of America, and a copy of which he promises to include in every on of his works published in the United States in which he has referred to America. 
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Price HK$ 2,800



Sketches by Boz illustrative of Every-Day Life and Every-Day People - Charles Dickens, F. Barnard (illustrator)

1876 - Chapman and Hall, 193 Piccadilly - Household Edition, and first Barnard illustrated edition
A handsomely bound edition of Charles Dickens's first published book, a funny and touching collection of observation, fancy and fiction showing the London he knew in all its complexity - its streets, theatres, inns, pawnshops, law courts, prisons and, of course, the river Thames. His descriptions of everyday life and people seem to anticipate characters from his great novels - garrulous matrons, vulgar young clerks, Scrooge-like bachelors - while his powers of social critique shine in his unflinching depictions of the city's forgotten citizens, from child workers to prostitutes.

With 34 illustrations by Frederick Barnard and the text in double columns.
 
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Price HK$ 2,500



John MacGregor (”Rob Roy”) - Edwin Hodder

1894 - Hodder Brothers, London - Second Edition
The comprehensive biography of the father of modern kayaking - John MacGregor (1825-91), known as ‘Rob Roy’.

Son of General Sir Duncan MacGregor, his schooling followed his fathers postings which included Canterbury and Dublin he graduated from Trinity College, Cambridge, having shown a talent for mathematics. His ambition to become a missionary was blocked after an argument with a superior who was a second-generation Polish immigrant who argued that MacGregor losing his temper and expressing anti-Polish sentiment was unbecoming of a missionary and he began a career as a Barrister but being of independent means he was able to follow his passion for travel.

MacGregor was a champion marksman but turned to boating when a railroad accident left him unable to hold a rifle steady. He designed his own boat, modelled after Indian canoes, 15 feet long, 28 inches wide, nine inches deep and weighed 80 pounds (36 kg) to be used with a double-bladed paddle. He named the boat Rob Roy after the celebrated Scottish outlaw of the same name, to whom he was related. During the 1860s, he had at least seven similar boats built and he sailed and paddled them in Europe, the Baltic and the Middle East.

MacGregor was a moderate, but very devout, Christian (he was in fact secretary of the Protestant League no less and believed in a ‘muscular Christianity’ based around exploits like kayaking), and was chairman of the Humane Society. He moved in high circles counting Charles Dickens and Robert Louis Stevenson among his friends, both of whom he persuaded to take up paddling. More than anything, MacGregor was instrumental in social reform in Victorian London, by association with another important friend, the Seventh Earl of Shaftesbury. Together they set up the Shoe-Black Brigade to offer better education prospects to the sort of wastrels that Dickens wrote about and would take MacGregor to see on his famous long, London walks.
 
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Price HK$ 900



The Boy's Book of Pirates and the Great Sea Rovers - George Alfred Williams

1913 - Frederick A. Stokes Company, New York - First Edition
‘Unlike most of the adventurers, who became buccaneers by force of circumstances, Morgan deliberately selected the prefession, and studied piracy with great deliberation. He was so imbued with the spirit of this life that it was not long before he rose to great prominence...’

A rather scarce book, containing eleven full page illustrations with stunning colour and vitality, this work which was written and illustrated by the great Dicken’s illustrator George Alfred Williams delighted audiences with tales of the exciting, gruesome, and gripping history of piracy, chronicling it’s rise from the birth of circumnavigation to the chaotic heyday of the 19th century.
 
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Price HK$ 1,500



 
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