The Man Who Watched The Trains Go By - Georges Simenon 1946 - Reynal & Hitchcock, New York - First American Edition In this Georges Simenon classic, a Dutch clerk flees to Paris with his crooked boss’s money and meets the woman behind the man.

A certain furtive, almost shameful emotion . . . disturbed him whenever he saw a train go by, a night train especially, its blinds drawn down on the mystery of its passengers.’

Kees Popinga is a respectable Dutch citizen and family man—until the day he discovers his boss has bankrupted the shipping firm he works for, and something snaps. Kees used to watch the trains go by on their way to exciting destinations. Now, on some dark impulse, he boards one at random, and begins a new life of recklessness and violence. The Man Who Watched the Trains Go By is a chilling portrayal of a man who breaks from society and goes on the run asks who we are, and what we are capable of.
  ‘Georges Simenon (1903-89), one of the true giants of the novel, has earned through the fecundity of his imagination and his devotion to his craft the right to be termed a genius. Apparently equally indifferent to critical scorn or praise, impervious tothe shifting currents of literary fashion, disdainful of pretentious philosophising or didacticism, Simenon has resolutely gone his own way, followed his unique vision, creating a body of work with the power and inevitability of life itself. Like Balzac or Dickens or Faulkner, he has staked out his own bleak territory of the human heart, a world of passion and violence, suffering and disorder... One of the most important novelists of his time, and certainly one of the major writers of detective fiction; his detective stories belong among the finest examples of the genre and, like other great detective stories, deserve serious critical study.’ - Reilly, Twentieth-Century Crime and Mystery Writers.

The first edition in English was published by George Routledge of London in 1942.

References: Penguin Random House (web). Herbert,
Oxford Companion to Crime & Mystery Writing, 276, 415. Haycraft, Murder for Pleasure, 108. Symons, Bloody Murder, 143. Reilly,Twentieth-Century Crime and Mystery Writers (1980), 1548.

Octavo (book size 19.7x13.6cm), pp. [8] 195 [3]. In publisher’s olive-grey cloth, spine lettered in black and red, front board lettered in black. Dust jacket priced ‘$2.50’ to upper corner of front flap, and with colour touch up to spine and front flap fold.
  Condition: Fine in near fine dust jacket with gentle colour touch-up to spine and front flap fold.   Ref: 110268   Price: HK$ 2,000