The Deerslayer - or - The First Warpath - James Fenimore Cooper, N. C. Wyeth (illustrator) 1929 - Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York - First Edition, Second Issue illustrated by Wyeth A finely bound first instalment of Fenimore Cooper’s Leatherstocking Tales, with illustrated colour title page and nine full page colour plates by N. C. Wyeth, one of America’s great illustrators.

The
Deerslayer is set during the years 1740-1745, describing Natty Bumppo’s youth. Inspired by romance, justice, and revenge Natty Bumppo together with his close friend Chingachgook, risks his life to free his friends love, and exact revenge for past atrocities.
  ‘James Fenimore Cooper was one of the first popular American novelists. Born in September 1789 in Burlington, New Jersey, Cooper grew up in Cooperstown, New York, a frontier settlement that he later dramatized in his novels. Cooper had a rambling and unpredictable early life. He attended Yale when he was only thirteen but was expelled for instigating a practical joke. His father forced him to join the Navy. Cooper began writing almost by accident. When reading a popular English novel aloud to his wife one day, Cooper suddenly tossed the book aside and said, “I could write you a better book myself!” He lived up to his claim by writing Precaution in 1820 and The Spy, his first popular success, the following year. For the rest of his life, Cooper attracted a massive readership on both sides of the Atlantic, a following rivalled in size only by that of Sir Walter Scott. When he died in 1851, Cooper was one of the most famous writers in the world.’

Born in Needham, Massachusetts in 1882, N.C. (Newell Convers) Wyeth was one of the most successful illustrators of his time, and the pre-eminent example of the results of Howard Pyle’s illustrative techniques. During his career, Wyeth painted nearly 4,000 illustrations for books and magazines, many of them embracing the American Western theme, and filled with cowboys, Indians, gun fighters and gold miners. He also illustrated many popular children’s stories, including
Tom Sawyer and Treasure Island, establishing visual images of characters that remained in young readers’ minds for generations. Tragically, Wyeth was killed in a car accident at a railroad crossing in 1945. Significant public collections of his work are on display at the Brandywine River Musem, in Chadds Ford, Delaware, Pennsylvania.

References:
National Museum of American Illustration, web. Canby, Life 1944. Geer. SparkNotes.

Tall octavo (binding size 23.6x16.5cm), pp. [2] x [2] 462 [4]. One or two outer edges chipped from original uncut edges.
  Elegantly bound in full black morocco, spine lettered ruled and decorated in gilt, top edge gilt others trimmed, marbled endpapers.   Condition: Fine in fine binding   Ref: 110138   Price: HK$ 4,000