Young Lonigan: A Boyhood in Chicago Streets - James T. Farrell 1932 - The Vanguard Press, New York - First Edition ‘An American classic in the vein of John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, the first book of James T. Farrell’s powerful Studs Lonigan trilogy covers five months of the young Lonigan’s life on the streets of 1916 Chicago , when he is sixteen years old. In this relentlessly naturalistic yet richly complex portrait, Studs is carried along by his swaggering and short-sighted companions, his narrow family, and his educational and religious background toward a fate that he resists yet cannot escape.’ (from a later edition).

‘Combines a gift for blending an Irish sense of malaise and disinheritance with a very American command of grit, determination and even, at times, a grim sort of humor.’ –
Wall Street Journal.

Note, even at the time of publication the publisher’s considered it necessary to print the following disclaimer on the dust jacket ‘
This novel is issued in a special edition, the sale of which is limited to physicians, surgeons, psychologists, psychiatrists, sociologists, social workers, teachers and other persons having a professional interest in the psychology of adolescence’.
  ‘I read Studs Lonigan my freshman year at Harvard, and it changed my life... I couldn’t get over the discovery. I wanted to write.’ - Norman Mailer.

James Thomas Farrell (1904—1979) was born in Chicago to a struggling family of second-generation Irish Catholic immi grants. In 1907, his father, James Farrell, a teamster unable to support his growing family, placed young Jim with his maternal grandparents. It was his grandparents’ neighbourhood in Chicago’s South Fifties that would provide the background to Farrell’s
Studs Lonigan trilogy. Farrell worked his way through the University of Chicago, shedding his Catholic upbringing and absorbing the works of William James, John Dewey, Sigmund Freud, while reading widely in American and European literature: Herman Melville, Sherwood Anderson, H. L. Mencken, Sinclair Lewis, and James Joyce were critical influences on his literary development. “Slob” (1929), his first published story, was also his first rendering of the real life “Studs Lonigan,” a young man he had known growing up in Chicago. Farrell’s first novel, Young Lonigan was published in 1932, followed by The Young Manhood of Studs Lonigan (1934) and Judgment Day (1935)—the three volumes making up his celebrated Studs Lonigan trilogy. A prolific writer, Farrell left more than fifty books of stories and novels behind him when he died in 1979. Alongside his masterpiece Studs Lonigan, Farrell’s best-known works include the Danny O’Neill novels, A World I Never Made, No Star is Lost, Father and Son, and My Days of Anger.

References: Penguin Classics, web.

pp. [2] xii [2] 15-308 [2]. In publisher’s brown patterned cloth, light orange-brown paper title labels to spine and front board lettered in brown, top edge tinted brown. Dust jacket priced $3.75. to lower corner of front flap, and with flap corners neatly trimmed as issued.
  Condition: Fine in near fine dust jacket with a hint of fading to the spine, and very light wear to the corners.   Ref: 108662   Price: HK$ 14,000