Light in August - William Faulkner 1932 - Harrison Smith and Robert Haas, New York - First Edition, first issue A superb first edition of Faulkner's seventh novel, an exploration of the lasting effects of racism and misogyny, one of four of his novels consistently ranked among the best of the twentieth century.

‘One of William Faulkner’s most admired and accessible novels, Light in August reveals the great American author at the height of his powers. Lena Grove’s resolute search for the father of her unborn child begets a rich, poignant, and ultimately hopeful story of perseverance in the face of mortality. It also acquaints us with several of Faulkner’s most unforgettable characters, including the Reverend Gail Hightower, plagued by visions of Confederate horsemen, and Joe Christmas, a ragged, itinerant soul obsessed with his mixed-race ancestry.’ -
Penguin Classics.
  Extract of an article from the Dilay Beast of 16th August 2012, by C. E. Morgan:-

‘it is the less mannered
Light in August, sometimes overlooked in discussions of his more overtly modernist works, that draws all of Faulkner’s familiar preoccupations — determinism vs. free will, the partially Reconstructed South, religiosity, the draw of female sexuality, and the power of the living past—around one overriding, ineradicably American concern: race.’

‘A book like Light in August becomes so simultaneously reflective of and embedded in the American literary consciousness that the two begin to resemble each other and, indeed, become each other. Great American Novels become both an indispensable part of understanding aspects of the American experience and a part of the American experience itself. One reads Huck Finn to understand America, and when one strives to understand America, one reads Huck Finn. As with Huck Finn, so with Uncle Tom’s Cabin, so with Invisible Man, and so with Light in August.’

‘A book like Light in August—which relentlessly explores the full complexity of the human and plunges us into the tangled thick of the language, both without regard for consequences— appears so rarely that its near cousin, the good but not great novel, threatens to supplant it entirely and elide the necessary distinction’

First printing with ‘
First Printing’ stated on the copyright page, first issue with ‘Jefferson’ instead of ‘Mottstown’ in the first line of page 340.

Octavo (21 x 14.8 cm) pp. [4] 480. In publisher’s rough tan cloth, lettered in blue and orange to spine, lettered in orange to the front board, top edge stained orange. Dust jacket priced ‘$2.50’ to lower corner of front flap, list of titles to rear panel beginning with ‘
Boyle, Kay’ ‘Year Before Last’.
  Condition: Fine in near fine dust jacket with only a modicum of rubbing to spine ends and corners, and with very good tissue wrapper, with some wear to corners, and 5 cm closed tear to rear panel.   Ref: 108927   Price: HK$ 69,000