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A Bibliographical, Antiquarian and Picturesque Tour in the Northern Counties of England and in Scotland - Reverend Thomas Frognall Dibdin

1838 - Printed for the author by C. Richards, London
Dibdin’s two volume bibliographic tour of the libraries of Northern England and Scotland, in contemporary bindings, richly illustrated with in-text engravings, forty full page plates as listed and two more not called for (’Facade of Entrance into the Glasgow Cemetery’ (701) and ‘Seal of Cardinal Beaton and of the University of St. Andrew’ (888))

Full of anecdotes, footnotes that tempt one astray from the text, and Dibdin’s thoughts on a variety of encounters, for example on drinking too much ‘Whiskey’ –

‘We were now then at Dumfries. During and after dinner, I made attacks upon the whiskey in every possible direction: with and without aqueous dilution – with and without saccharine infusion: but to no purpose. “Disguise thyself as thou wilt, still, WHISKEY, still thou art a bitter draught”*. With or without sugar, or water – hot or cold – still thou art brimstone and fire to-day, and fire and brimstone to-morrow. As it was my
first, so it was my last, experiment upon this generally seductive liquor with the Scotch. In the everlasting toddy-potations at Glasgow, I could never be brought to hear my part in brandishing a ladle or emptying a rummer. Even its infusion into the punch-bowl there, though that bowl came fresh and foaming from the “cunning” hand of the good Joseph Hunter, Esq. – even then, the slightest infusion of this pellucid dram seemed, to my palate, to opison the wholeof its contents. “Ah, sir, but you should just live in the mountains a twelvemonth – and then!” – “Execrate it the more”, replied I. My disputant thought me a “hopeless character:” and I bade a longum vale to whiskey.

*Substitute “slavery” for “whiskey”, and the quotation is from Sterne. They place very small bottles or decanters of this liquor by the side of a glass, before you; and I believe sixpence will supply you with a portion . . . sufficient to make your head ache for a week. It is poetically called “MOUNTAIN DEW” !’ [Volume II page 446].
 
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Price HK$ 5,000



Tess of The D'Urbervilles - Thomas Hardy

1895 - Osgood, London - First Single Volume Edition
Finely bound early edition, and the first to contain a new additional preface by Thomas Hardy, as well as a frontispiece portrait of the author by H Macbeth-Raeburn

‘In Tess, Hardy presents a world in which the human spirit is battered down by the forces, not of fate, but of social hierarchy. Tess’s eventual death, one of the most famous in literature, is a direct result of human cruelty and as such represents one of the most moving indictments of the lives of nineteenth-century English women in all of literature’ – Alvin Birdy.
 
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Price HK$ 5,500



The Essays of Elia and The Last Essays of Elia - Charles Lamb

1900 Circa - Thomas Nelson and Sons, New York
Exquisitely bound by Sangorski & Sutcliffe, with frontispiece portrait of Charles Lamb and a contemporary Tiffany & Co. engraved bookplate of Cecil and Adelaide North. In two parts, with an introduction and notes by George Woodberry.

‘One of the classics of English prose and a cornerstone of the personal essay tradition. All personal essayists worth their salt owe a huge debt to this generous and generative collection... ; all apprentice essayists who would strive to make headway in the form will need to read it... Essays of Elia is not only an essential text, but a near-buried treasure, an all-but-lost masterpiece in our contemporary culture.’ - Philip Lopate.

Published under the pseudonym "Elia," Charles Lamb’s book, by turns witty, insightful, self-deprecating, and philosophical, offers an unusually warm, human glimpse of life in a circle that included such luminaries as Coleridge, Wordsworth, and William Hazlitt. Published in
The London Magazine in the early 1820s, these often nostalgic essays are important documents in the development of autobiographical writing which gained him a devoted following among 19th-century readers. - [from a recent edition] 
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Price HK$ 4,200



The Faces in the Fire the Shadows on the Wall; with Other Tales and Sketches - George Frederick Pardon, T. H. Nicholson (illustrator)

1856 - James Blackwood, London - First Edition Thus
A bizarre, yet fascinating ‘copycat’ take on the success of Dickens’ yuletide publications, although denied in Pardon’s introduction, together with a new Christmas tale and other sketches previously unpublished.

With wonderful four hand-coloured engravings and and ten black and white woodcut vignettes by artist T. H. Nicholson.
 
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Price HK$ 1,200



Diary and Correspondence - Samuel Pepys

1848 - Henry Colburn, London - Third Edition, Considerably Enlarged
A finely bound five volumes edition of probably the most famous diary in the English language, illustrated throughout with full page plates and a folding historical map of London.

‘The 1660s represent a turning point in English history, and for the main events - the Restoration, the Dutch War, the Great Plague, the Fire of London - Pepys provides a definitive eyewitness account. As well as recording public and historical events, Pepys paints a vivid picture of his personal life, from his socialising and amorous entanglements, to his theatre-going and his work at the Navy Board. Unequalled for its frankness, high spirits and sharp observations, the diary is both a literary masterpiece and a marvellous portrait of seventeenth-century life’.
 
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Price HK$ 7,500



The Works of Alexander Pope - with a Memoir of the Author, Notes, and Critical Notices on each Poem, by the Rev, G. Croly, LL.D. - Alexander Pope

1835 - A.J. Valpy, London - First Edition
In four small finely bound volumes, with engraved frontispiece and engraved title to each volume.

English essayist, critic, satirist, and one of the greatest poets of Enlightenment, also known for his translation of Homer. Alexander Pope [1688-1744] wrote his first verses at the age of 12. His breakthrough work,
An Essay on Criticism appeared when he was twenty-three. It included the famous line ‘a little learning is a dangerous thing’. Pope's physical defects made him an easy target for heartless mockery, but he was also considered a leading literary critic and the epitome of English Neoclassicism. His translation of Homer is still considered  
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Price HK$ 8,000



Duty - With illustrations of Courage Patience and Endurance - Samuel Smiles

1905 - John Murray, London - Early edition (first published 1880)
‘Not once or twice in our rough island story,
The path of Duty was the way to glory’ - Tennyson.

The last in Samuel Smiles’ wise and popular ‘Self-Help’ series, in which ‘
the reader will find, in the following pages, numerous examples given of thee best and bravest men and women in the career of well-doing’. 
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Price HK$ 1,200



The Voyages of Lemuel Gulliver to Lilliput and Brobdingnag [Gulliver's Travels] - Jonathan Swift, Edward Bawden (illustrator)

1948 - The Folio Society, London - First Bawden Illustrated Edition
A handsomely bound Gulliver's Travels, the first edition to contain illustrations by Edward Bawden. 
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Price HK$ 2,500



 
Results 9 - 16 of 22 results
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