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1911 - Sidgwick & Jackson, London - Number 17 of 35 copies
‘A remarkable book. . . . We know of no book which gives in so few words as this so satisfying, so complete, and so graceful a picture of Edinburgh. If you want to understand the heart of Edinburgh, you can read it here better than in a hundred guide books.’ – The Spectator

A lovely copy of this large, illustrated work on Edinburgh, with text by Bone based on his impressions and opinions of the city during a visit in 1910, and beautifully accompanied by Fletcher’s seventy-five drawings, including 16 tipped-in collotype plates and a lovely frontispiece etching depicting Edinburgh from Salisbury Craig. This copy also features an additional hand-signed etching by Fletcher, the same as frontispiece, bound in at the front.
 
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Price HK$ 4,000



1914 - Henry Young & Sons, Liverpool - Number 405 of 500 copies, signed by the publishers
Two finely bound volumes, illustrated with thirty-one plates. and produced on thick paper. Included is an Essay on Robert Burns by Sir Walter Raleigh, by a Memoir of Lockhart, the Author’s Preface and notes and appendices by William Scott Douglas.

‘Lockhart's
Life of Burns, his first sustained attempt in biography, was for a century and more the standard account of the poet and his work. If Lockhart is sometimes limited, he is generally sensible he was born just before Burns died, and had access to men who had seen and known the poet his critical approach is often close to that of the literary world to which Burns, for a time, turned a hopeful eye and his succinct sketches of Burns's milieu and of the men in it, are excellent.’ ‘One of the few judicious and eminently readable biographies of Burns.’ - Professor James Kinsley, introduction to the 2006 edition. 
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Price HK$ 4,000



Annals of Scotland, from the Accession of Malcolm III, in the Year MLVII to the Accession of the House of Stewart in the Year MCCCLXXI. - Sir David Dalrymple of Hailes, Bart.

1819 - Archibald Constable & Co. and Fairbairn & Anderson., Edinburgh - Third Edition
Two volumes, encompassing Dalrymple’s greatest work, the third volume, which comprised of Dalrymple’s other historical writings is not included.

‘Lord Hailes's most important contribution to literature was the
Annals of Scotland, of which the first volume, From the accession of Malcolm III, surnamed Canmore, to the accession of Robert I, appeared in 1776, and the second, From the accession of Robert I, surnamed Bruce, to the accession of the house of Stewart, in 1779. It is, as his friend Dr Johnson justly described this work at the time of its appearance, a ‘Dictionary" of carefully sifted facts, which tells all that is wanted and all that is known, but without any laboured splendour of language or affected subtlety of conjecture’.’ 
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Price HK$ 2,000



A Bibliographical, Antiquarian and Picturesque Tour in the Northern Counties of England and in Scotland - Reverend Thomas Frognall Dibdin

1838 - Printed for the author by C. Richards, London
Dibdin’s two volume bibliographic tour of the libraries of Northern England and Scotland, in contemporary bindings, richly illustrated with in-text engravings, forty full page plates as listed and two more not called for (’Facade of Entrance into the Glasgow Cemetery’ (701) and ‘Seal of Cardinal Beaton and of the University of St. Andrew’ (888))

Full of anecdotes, footnotes that tempt one astray from the text, and Dibdin’s thoughts on a variety of encounters, for example on drinking too much ‘Whiskey’ –

‘We were now then at Dumfries. During and after dinner, I made attacks upon the whiskey in every possible direction: with and without aqueous dilution – with and without saccharine infusion: but to no purpose. “Disguise thyself as thou wilt, still, WHISKEY, still thou art a bitter draught”*. With or without sugar, or water – hot or cold – still thou art brimstone and fire to-day, and fire and brimstone to-morrow. As it was my
first, so it was my last, experiment upon this generally seductive liquor with the Scotch. In the everlasting toddy-potations at Glasgow, I could never be brought to hear my part in brandishing a ladle or emptying a rummer. Even its infusion into the punch-bowl there, though that bowl came fresh and foaming from the “cunning” hand of the good Joseph Hunter, Esq. – even then, the slightest infusion of this pellucid dram seemed, to my palate, to opison the wholeof its contents. “Ah, sir, but you should just live in the mountains a twelvemonth – and then!” – “Execrate it the more”, replied I. My disputant thought me a “hopeless character:” and I bade a longum vale to whiskey.

*Substitute “slavery” for “whiskey”, and the quotation is from Sterne. They place very small bottles or decanters of this liquor by the side of a glass, before you; and I believe sixpence will supply you with a portion . . . sufficient to make your head ache for a week. It is poetically called “MOUNTAIN DEW” !’ [Volume II page 446].
 
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Price HK$ 5,000



Abbotsford Series of the Scottish Poets - George Eyre-Todd (Editor)

1891 -1896 - William Hodge, Glasgow - First Editions
Six works finely bound in seven volumes, packed with ballads and poems of conviviality, from Robert Fergusson’s ode to the ‘Daft-Days’ [Vol VII p135], and Burns’ ‘Tam O’Shanter’ and ‘Willie Brew'd A Peck O' Maut’[Vol VII p176/217], to Henryson’s ‘Testament of Cresseid’ [Vol II p.104] in which, according to Daiches, we may assume the first recorded wee dram in Scottish literature, and Allan Ramsay’s ‘Up i’ the Air’....

‘Tak’ your glass to clear your een,
It’s the elixir heals the spleen;
Baith wit and mirth it will inspire,
And gently puffs the lover's fire.
Up i’ the air,
It drives away care,
Hae wi’ ye, hae wi’ ye, and hae wi’ ye, lads, yet.’ [Vol.VI, p.65].

The first and still comprehensive collection of the Scottish poets, combined with Eyre-Todd’s biographical details for each poet, and historic notes, glossary and essays. Which on publication the
Spectator praised as ‘a useful and indeed a valuable contribution to the history of Scottish literature’. 
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Price HK$ 4,000



1804 - Printed by T. Bensley for W. Miller, London - First Edition
This remarkable work contains forty-eight engraved plates of Scottish Landscapes and buildings etched by James Fittler (appointed engraver to King George III) from drawings by John Claude Nattes, each one accompanied by a detailed historic description. In addition to the more well known locations of Edinburgh and the Scottish Highlands, Nattes included places such as Aberdeen, Banff, Moray and Inverness.

In a contemporary binding (35.5 x 29 cm), also illustrated with engraved frontispiece, additional engraved title page, and engraved tailpiece.
 
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Price HK$ 8,000



Highland Sport - A Grimble

1894 - Chapman and Hall Ltd., London - First Edition
A large and beautifully bound work Illustrated with eleven full page plates by Archibald Thorburn.

Personal recollections and views on fishing and shooting in the highlands of Scotland. Grimble was the first to call for a close time to the Salmon fishing season in Scotland after witnessing the alarming drop in catch, and rise in netting technology and quantity. He was successful.
 
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Price HK$ 4,200



The Antiquities of Scotland - Francis Grose

1797 - Hooper & Wigstead, London - First Hooper & Wigstead edition
Two magnificently illustrated volumes, of this comprehensive work, with 190 full page engraved plates, large engraved folding Index Map to the Antiquities of Scotland. Shewing the Situation of Every Building Described in this Work, two engraved title pages, and one in text Plan of Druidical Stone.

Grose (1731-91), English antiquary draughtsman and lexicographer, initiated the eighteenth-century's most extensive series of published illustrations of ancient monuments.

In 1788 he began the first of several tours of Scotland in order to produce
The Antiquities of Scotland. It was on the second of these tours, in summer 1789, that he met and immediately formed a friendship with the poet Robert Burns. Burns met him while he was staying with Robert Riddell at the Friar's Carse, collecting material for his Scottish work. Burns suggested to him that he should include Alloway Kirk in his Scottish Antiquities, and Grose agreed on condition that Burns provided a witch tale to go with his drawing. In June 1790, Burns sent Grose a prose tale with a variant in a letter to Grose, following it up with a rhymed version, "Tam o' Shanter" (see Volume II, page 31). 
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Price HK$ 8,000



 
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