Results 49 - 56 of 61 results

Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde - Robert Louis Stevenson

1886 - Longmans, London - First Edition, Cloth Issue
With every day, and from both sides of my intelligence, the moral and the intellectual, I thus drew steadily nearer to the truth, by whose partial discovery I have been doomed to such a dreadful shipwreck: that man is not truly one, but truly two.’

First edition of this classic mystery horror story (or Crawler as Stevenson called it), inspired by the case of the Edinburgh body snatchers Burke and Hare, and written in just three days, although it was shelved by the author for three years as he considered it too disturbing for publication.
Jekyll and Hyde is a chilling masterpiece work; a brilliantly suggestive, resonant study of human duality by a natural storyteller. 
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Price HK$ 11,000



An Embassy to the Kingdom of Ava - Michael Symes

1800 - W. Bulmer and Co., London - First Edition, Large Paper Copy
A stunning and rare large paper copy of ‘the first full account of Burma to be published’, finely illustrated with two folding engraved maps, eighteen engraved plates, and eight engraved botanical plates (four of which are folding). In contemporary full polished calf armourial binding of Sir Richard Colt Hoare, 2nd Baronet, and once housed in the Hoare Library at Stourhead.

Michael Symes was sent by Sir John Shore, governor-general of India, on a mission to Ava in Burma, to obtain from the emperor of Ava a permit to allow a British agent to reside at Rangoon, and to induce him to close his borders to French shipping. In diplomatic terms Symes’ mission was a success.

His detailed account, is highly interesting with keen observations and insight. ‘It is a mass of information on the history, religion, government, social systems, language, geography and economy of Burma, together with a narrative of Symes’ seven months stay in Burma, his journey to the capital and reception at court.’
 
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Price HK$ 42,000



The ‘Chronicles of Barsetshire’, with ‘An Autobiography’ - Anthony Trollope, Charles S. Olcott (Photographs)

1929 - Shakespeare Head Press, Stratford-upon-Avon - Large Paper Edition
‘There is, perhaps, no greater hardship at present inflicted on mankind in civilised and free countries than the necessity of listening to sermons.’

A handsome mostly unopened thirteen volume set of Trollope’s
Chronicles of Barsetshire, comprising The Warden, Barchester Towers, Doctor Thorne, Framley Parsonage, The Small House at Allington, and The Last Chronicle of Barset, together with the matching single volume of Trollope’s autobiography. The final volume also contains an ‘Index to Characters’.

The
Chronicles examine every facet of the human condition by following the lives of men and women residing in the (fictional) cathedral town of Barchester. The novels remain an exquisite example of 19th century romantic-realism, and were praised by Nathiel Hawthorn as being ‘just as real as if some giant had hewn a great lump out of the earth and put it under a glass case, with all its inhabitants going about their daily business, and not suspecting that they were made a show of.’

Illustrated profusely with photographic plates taken by Charles Sumner Olcott (1864-1935), to represent the major features, landmarks, and buildings within Barsetshire county, and to which he adds an introduction to explain his choice of locations and imagery.
 
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Price HK$ 5,300



An Account of an Embassy to the Court of the Teshoo Lama, in Tibet; containing A Narrative of a Journey through Bootan, and Part of Tibet. - Captain Samuel Turner, Lieutenant Samuel Davis, Robert Saunders

1800 - Printed by W. Bulmer and Co. for G. and W. Nicol, London - First Edition
First edition, large paper copy, of ‘the first eye-witness report on Tibet and Bhutan to be published in English.’

With fourteen copper-engraved plates including the drawings of Samuel Davis ‘a surveyor and draftsman for the Bengal Army, he accompanied the second British embassy, in 1783, to Druk Yul, the Kingdom of the Thunder Dragon. These elegant depictions attest to the only foreign artist “of distinction” to show Bhutan, and the first outsider to paint scenes from these mountains’ [Michael Aris
Views of Medieval Bhutan]. The geographical focus of this work is split between Bhutan (180 pages) and Tibet (246 pages), together with thirty pages of appendices.

In addition to Davis’ illustrations and the folding map of Bootan and Tibet by Turner (58 x 23.5 cm), is the marvellously Mona-Lisa’esque ‘
Yak of Tartary’, an engraved aquatint by De la Motte of the Bhutanese yak that Turner successfully shipped alive back to Hastings, where it was painted by George Stubbs, better known for his paintings of horses. 
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Price HK$ 35,000



Diplomatic and Consular Reports on Trade - Various

1897 to 1907 - Foreign Office, London - First Editions
A total of 116 various diplomatic and consular reports on China and the numerous British Consuls, dated from 1896 to 1906, finely bound into two thick volumes.

With reports ‘
On the trade of China’ for the years 1896 to 1905 (the last being of 120 pages in length), together with a selection of individual annual reports on Amoy, Canton, Changhshha, Chefoo, Chinkiang, Chungking, Foochow, Hangchow, Hangkow / Hankow, Ichang, Kiukiang, Kiungchow / Hoihow, Newchwang, Ningpo, Pakhoi, and Samshui, as well as an industry specific report on ‘on the Cotton Mills of China

The reports range from the dry to eloquent and detailed, obviously depending on the importance of the area and the character of the consul and staff making the report, include a number of maps, plans and charts.
 
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Price HK$ 16,000



The Story of Reynard the Fox - David Vedder, Gustav Canton (illustrator)

1847 - David Bogue, London - Second Edition
Lithographed by David Vedder’s son-in-law Frederick Schenck (Schenck & McFarlane, Edinburgh), and considered on its appearance ‘the best edition of this famous story yet presented in England’ (London Literary Gazette, 1852).

Illustrated by Gustav Canton of Munich and Dusseldorf, with 9 two-tone lithographic plates, 5 colour lithographic plates, 1 in-text engraving, 8 vignettes, and 19 decorated letter pieces.

‘Vedder’s book is splendidly illustrated by the German artist Gustav Canton, but modestly so and in keeping with a text which has been carefully expurgated and made suitable for decent young people... Vedder’s text is based on the 1706 English verse translation of Hartmann Schopper’s 1569 Latin text, this, in turn, is based, via a 1544 High German shortened translation, on that of the 1498 Lübeck Low German, and thence back to the Flemish on which Caxton drew.’ - Kenneth Varty,
Reynard the Fox: Cultural Metamorphoses and Social Engagement in the Beast Epic [171].

‘The illustration of Reynard the Fox, will always be a tempting one to artists who possess the gift of humorously indicating human character, passions, follies, and infirmities, in brute form. This power is in the command of Gustav Canton ; whose humour, readiness, and clever combination, are considerable, — marred, however, by an unfortunate vulgarity of artistic style, at any rate as represented in these lithographs.’ - Review of this edition in
The Spectator, January 1847. 
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Price HK$ 1,200



The Brigand - Edgar Wallace

1927 - Hodder and Stoughton, London - First Edition
Lovely fine copy, in the scarce first edition dust jacket, albeit with later strengthening.

‘Anthony Newton was a soldier at sixteen; at twenty-six he was a beggar of favours, a patient waiter in outer offices, a more or less meek respondent to questionnaires which bore a remarkable resemblance one to the other. Newton struggled through eight years of odd jobs. And at the end of the eighth year he discussed the situation with himself and soberly elected for brigandage of a safe and more or less unobjectionable variety.

The dictionary defines a brigand as a robber or a bandit, particularly from an outlaw band. But that definition is perhaps too harsh for Tony Newton; he focuses on "the art of gentle robbery." And he succeeds, as he himself modestly admits.

The Brigand is a collection of twelve stories, each an escapade of Tony Newton as he moves from one adventure to another, one gullible rich man to another, escaping a detection here, a marriage to a "plum pudding girl" there, a murder attempt elsewhere, even becoming a successful member of the House of Commons in one delightful episode.

The Brigand is Edgar Wallace at his best - simple story lines, a loveable character with whom you empathise even though you know that he not quite on the straight path, a bit of crime, loads of humour, some deceptively simple philosophising. Among the lesser known one-book-only characters created by Edgar Wallace, Tony Newton would probably be right up there on the top.’ 
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Price HK$ 1,200



Shadow Plays of Peking - Wang Hsun, Lu Ching Ta (Lu Jing Da)

1953 - People's Fine Arts Publishing House, Peking - First Edition
A large (52 x 38 cm) and rare silk bound and tied folio, presenting the history of Sung Dynasty (A.D. 960-1279) shadow play, with 15 stunning full page colour lithographs of Chinese shadow puppets by Lu Ching-ta, and an introduction by Wang Hsu, text in Chinese, together with loose eight page pamphlet giving the title and full introduction in English, and detailed description of each illustration, and in the original dust jacket.

Edited by the Department of Applied Arts, Central Institute of Fine Arts, Beijing.
 
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Price HK$ 18,000



 
Results 49 - 56 of 61 results